Investigations

At this time, we plan to resume in-person activities for Spring 2022 alongside virtual offerings. If the situation with COVID-19 changes, we will keep you informed, while continuing to follow CDC recommendations, FSU policy, and the policy of your school district.

We have a selection of investigations available for in person and/or virtual visits. Please use the "Format" filter below and/or note the details for the individual investigations to ensure you consider investigations that are appropriate for your class and location.

Please note:

  • Investigations typically require at least a full 45 minutes per class (not accounting for transitions between classes), and 60 minutes is preferred.
  • Each class/session should not have more than 25 students.
  • In person visits are available in the Big Bend region, within a 1 hour drive from Tallahassee.
  • For virtual visits, Science on the Move staff will interact with your students via Zoom (or similar). The hands-on portion can be enacted as a presenter-led demonstration by Science on the Move staff or by the students if you wish to supply the materials. 
  • For more information on visits, see the FAQs.

To sign up, see the Visit Requests page.

3-2-1 Blast Off

Format: In Person | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8)

A student favorite and beloved tradition in many schools! Students apply their knowledge of experimental design to draw conclusions about the effects launch angle and launch velocity have on the horizontal range of a rocket.

This investigation requires the use of a large open field with an access point for the van.

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Keyword(s): Projectile, Kinematics

Acid Rain

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8)

Physical and chemical changes are compared through a simple model of acid rain. Students get excited as they create a bubbly chemical reaction. 

This investigation requires basic familiarity with physical and chemical changes.

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Keyword(s): Physical Changes, Chemical Changes

Do You See What I See?

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Lower Elementary (K-3)

Students make observations and draw diagrams as they observe objects through a microscope. Students are amazed at the details the microscope reveals. 

This investigation requires access to a power outlet.

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Keyword(s): Microscopes, Observing small objects

Don't Overreact

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8), High (9-12)

Students use their senses to detect a chemical change. Watch their eyes widen as they hold a bag that changes temperature, fills with gas, and changes color. This activity is derived from the GEMS Chemical Reactions.

This investigation requires basic familiarity with chemical changes.

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Keyword(s): Physical Changes, Chemical Changes

Freeze Your Mind

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8), High (9-12)

Students unpack the concept of heat by comparing how ice responds to different materials. There are plenty of surprises as the ice melts! 

This investigation requires access to ice.

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Keyword(s): Temperature, Heat

I See the Light

Format: In Person | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8), High (9-12)

Students use light boxes to explore the effects lenses and mirrors have on the path of light. They then consider the human eye and what it means to be near- or far-sighted.

This investigation requires access to power outlets.

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Keyword(s): optics, reflection, refraction

Sea for Yourself

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8)

Students consider density in the context of ocean flows as they make predictions and then test their ideas by creating their own density currents!

This investigation requires access to a water supply, ice, and a power outlet.

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Keyword(s): Density, Ocean Currents

Sink or Swim - Who Will Win?

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Lower Elementary (K-3)

Students test whether different objects sink or float and consider the relationship to material properties. Students get excited as items sink or float unexpectedly! They then engage in an engineering challenge to build a boat that will float and hold as many marbles as possible!

This investigation requires access to a water supply.

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Keyword(s): Sinking and Floating

Sparking Ideas About Uniform Motion

Format: In Person | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8), High (9-12)

Spark timers and toy cars are used to spark student ideas about uniform motion and make connections between physical motion and graphical representation!

This investigation requires basic familiarity with graphical representations of data and access to power outlets.

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Keyword(s): Kinematics, Motion, Graphs

Stormy Weather

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8)

What does the inside of a hurricane look like? Students unpack this question using a tank model and all its stormy patterns.

This investigation requires access to a water supply and a power outlet. 

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Keyword(s): Density, Heat Transfer, Convection, Hurricanes

Walk This Way

Format: In Person | Grade: Middle (6-8), High (9-12)

Get your students on their feet in the name of science! Students are challenged to match a given position-time graph by moving in front of a motion detector and develop their understanding of graphical representations of motion. 

This investigation requires access to a power outlet.

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Keyword(s): Motion, Graphs

Whatever Floats Your Boat

Format: In Person | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8)

Using Archimedes Blocks, students are challenged to use fractions to investigate density and the impact on sinking and floating!

This investigation requires basic skill with division and simple fractions. Access to a water supply is also required.

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Keyword(s): Sinking and Floating, Density, Fractions

You're Oil I Need

Format: In Person, Virtual | Grade: Upper Elementary (4-5), Middle (6-8)

Students use a simple model to consider what happens during an oil spill, making predictions, observations and explanations. Students are surprised by how the oil and water will not mix, however hard they try!

This investigation requires access to a water supply.

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Keyword(s): Density, Oil Spills